Statistical dojo

This seems apt – and the book it comes from is available free (or “pay what you want”) at readthesequences.com. Recommended. Imagine reaching into an urn that contains seventy white balls and thirty red ones, and plucking out ten mystery balls. Perhaps three of the ten balls will be red, and you’ll correctly guess how many red balls total were…

3012: On DriverlessCrocodiles, Robert the Bruce and spiders

Celebration time: on 14th November DC hit 3,000 views. It’s worth noting (as always) that in internet terms, this is the tiniest number. It’s also worth noting that it’s signficant to me, and I’m happy about it – and thank you for coming! I’ve written before about both how liberating is to know that almost no-one reads what I write,…

198

DC had 198 views in March, from 82 visitors. In internet terms, this is a pitiful statistic. Almost no-one reads anything I write. But I love it. Even apart from the fact that I write DC for reasons other than its enormous readership, I love it. I mean, apart from this, when was the last thing anything I’ve written was…

Dropping catches

In Moneyball Michael Lewis describes how baseball manager Billy Beane – following the work of sabermetrician Bill James – used statistics to upturn perceptions about a group of undervalued players. These players often ‘just missed’ – they didn’t quite make base, didn’t quite make the catch, or just fumbled it – and were labelled unathletic or clumsy by coaches and…