Stimulus and response

MIND THE GAP… … is good advice: If you’re prone to saying things you regret. If you’re feeling snappy. When you’re under pressure. Most of the time. As we learn to mind the gap – first to see it as it whistles by; then to squeeze in a tiny breath and moderate our response; and then (in time) to pause…

Responsive (3): Good tone

Outside a close circle of family and friends, the voice you respond in is rarely (just) your own – it’s also the voice of your project or organisation, or of your department or team. These means that these questions about your tone of voice apply to the groups you’re speaking for too. As far as it lies with you, how…

Responsive (2): Your voice

Being “responsive” is more than a question of timing. Your voice and “default” tone matter. Your voice What do you sound like as you respond to others? What would you like to sound like? It might help to make a list: Friendly, open and available – even when saying “no”; Positive / “can do” / constructive / helpful; Interested /…

Responsive (1): In good time

The way we respond to people – family, colleagues, strangers – carries a lot of information. Any response at all suggests that someone matters – whether because we like them or they’re otherwise important to us, or because they’re somehow in our way. The speed of our responses to people speaks volumes, and can send mixed messages. A fast response…