Finishing lines (2)

Recognising the possibility – or rather, the inevitability – of the death of your project will focus your mind: Given that we can’t do anything in the time available, what’s most important? Will people miss us when we’re gone? Will your project’s main legacy be something physical you’ll leave behind, or an idea or value, or a change in people?…

Finishing lines (1)

Or The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living Where are the finishing lines for your project? Some projects get finished up and wrapped up neatly, others (often work serving people, like education or government) are by nature never finished. If your project has no clear…

Keepy uppies

Try playing keepy uppies with your projects: Do something every day, however small, to move them on and keep them alive Find friends for the project – people doing similar work, people interested in what you’re working on – and maintain a conversation about what you’re learning Keep half of your free moments empty – moments when you’d pick up…

Leg ups

It’s easy to recruit people or find partners if you lower your standards, but you almost certainly shouldn’t – apart from anything else, when will you stop? A more useful approach is asking what you can do to help people get to the starting line. You might: Get better at finding to the right people at the right time; Be…

Starting line

Where’s the starting line for your project? How good does someone need to be to… Work for you? Work with you? For you to work for them? What type of ‘good’ are you looking for? It’s highly likely that the best contractor / employee / partner / donor / customer isn’t simply the cheapest / most available / one with…

Five Questions: Krissie Ducker

1) Introduce yourself: who are you, what do you do, and why is it important? I’m Krissie Ducker. I am a screenwriter for TV, and one day I’d like to write a film that actually gets made (I’ve written many un-produced movie scripts). It’s important (for me) because it was my dream to do this, and the fact I actually get…

Values and vision: the acid test

Peter Drucker and Stephen Covey ask the same simple question to get at the heart of these: “What do you want to be remembered for?” Covey asks you to imagine your funeral: Who is there? What do you hope they’d say about you? Is this consistent with how you live now? Which goals and relationships matter, in the end? Which…

Sketchpad studio springboard

Fit for Purpose or Good Enough mean different things depending on what we’re talking about, who it’s for and where and how it’s going to be seen – which is to say that they exist in a network, and that Good Enough can change even for a single piece of work. This often happens as a function of time: Dirt…

Prominence

Making prominence your aim is like building a skyscraper without laying foundations: you might make something tall, but it’s unlikely to last and it will almost certainly cause damage when it collapses. Rather than trying to stick out from the landscape on your own, far better to aim at lifting those around you and be happily surprised if you end…

Velcro, geckos, and making friends

Some ideas for strengthening your connections within a group of people or scene: Have good, generous intentions. Show up to serve or share where it’s needed and wanted and because being part of this network is its own reward (you like the people, you like what they do), rather than for what you might get out of it. Start small…