The Toolkit – Part 1: Foundations (4)

This post is part of the working draft of the DriverlessCrocodile Toolkit (read more here). I’d love comments, links to resources related to the theme, and original contributions. Would they miss you? Why? This question works for examining your personal values, and it’s a great pivot for thinking about the values of your organisation too. What do you hope people…

The Toolkit – Part 1: Foundations (3)

This post is part of the working draft of the DriverlessCrocodile Toolkit (read more here). I’d love comments, links to resources related to the theme, and original contributions. Another lens on personal values If the obituary doesn’t work for you, try these simple questions: What do you love? What do you care (passionately) about? What makes you (righteously) angry? Who…

No mistakes. No regrets. (2)

Mistakes of technique … are to be expected and – to a degree – accepted. You’ll drop catches, make miss-hits, typos, errors of arithmetic. These things happen. Yes, we can improve our technique, and we can improve the system where these mistakes occur. But we should accept that mistakes likes these are part of what it means to be playing…

No mistakes. No regrets. (1)

Really? As in, what kind of godlike, super-mega-ultra-lightning babe do you think you are? Of course you will make mistakes, and regret making some of them. New mistakes … are utterly essential to progress. Of course it’s foolish to seek to make mistakes – but we must consistently seek situations and opportunities in which we’ll make them. It’s not enough…

The Toolkit – Part 1: Foundations (2)

This post is part of the working draft of the DriverlessCrocodile Toolkit (read more here). I’d love comments, links to resources related to the theme, and original contributions. Values The best exercise I know for thinking about you values comes from Stephen Covey. If you haven’t done this before, it’s worth taking his advice and taking a few minutes over…

The Toolkit – Part 1: Foundations (1)

This post is part of the working draft of the DriverlessCrocodile Toolkit (read more here). I’d love comments, links to resources related to the theme, and original contributions. Barking up the right tree Most of this toolkit is concerned with tools – including knowledge and ways of thinking – that will be useful as you work for change. But we…

Peter Drucker on performance appraisals

Effective executives usually work out their own unique form of performance appraisal. It starts out with a statement of the major contributions expected from a person in his past and present positions and a record of their performance against these goals. Then it asks four questions: 1) What has he or she done well? 2) What, therefore, is he or…

Hard conversations

…aren’t supposed to be easy. The person you need to have the conversation with might be a peer, a friend, a long-term colleague. The conversations are uncomfortable in the planning, in the preparation and in the aftermath – often because they highlight your own weaknesses or lay you open to charges of hypocrisy or favouritism, however hard you’ve tried. But…

The switch (2)

“What am I hoping to get?” Once we’ve admitted to ourselves that we’re doing our work (at least partly) for ourselves, we can think more clearly about our motives by asking “What am I hoping to get from doing this?” And we’re probably hoping to get several things: the knowledge that we’ve helped someone, the satisfaction of a job well…

The switch (1)

“Who is this for?” Your work is always for you. This is true whether we’re working for pay or we’re parenting, whether we’re working on something that’s very obviously for ourselves or giving up time, energy and money to serve others. Even at our best (most generous, most sacrificial) – perhaps especially at our best – we’re working for ourselves.…