It could have been better (3): Seth Godin on “good enough” and the pursuit of perfection

The pursuit of perfection gets in the way of doing the work that we need to do. … What does perfection actually mean? … It is entirely possible that, as a marketing effort, your definition of “good enough” is “much better than people expect”. If you define “good enough” as “remarkable in the way that customers experiences it,” you’ve still…

It could have been better (2): Seth Godin on limits to quality

We must never accept shoddy work – it doesn’t make any sense to make something not as good as it should be. But we are always making things that are not as good as they could be, because if we have unlimited time and unlimited money of course we would make something differently. But we don’t have unlimited time, and…

Alright on the night

If you don’t practice, it’s not very likely to be. Doing something for real is likely to be the best practice if the stakes aren’t too high, and if you’re likely to get enough goes at it. But if you can’t practise “in the wild,” consider a dress rehearsal, where everything is as close to possible as the real thing.…

tl;dr

We live in an era where people will spend days of their lives – hours at a time – to watch a box set or series of movies. We spend hours listening to podcasts. We still read novels. Long isn’t a problem; “too” is. So if “too” means “It would have been better for the people it was made for…

A brief presentation

Is it?* Don’t say it unless you’re sure.** *Brief depends on context, but in the absence of a clear norm a 5 minute presentation – 10 minutes including pre- and post-amble – is a good rule of thumb. **Even if you are, it’s probably better to say how long – and always say it will be five minutes longer than…

Freedom to the nose

Your right to swing your arm leaves off where my right not to have my nose struck begins. John B Finch (early version of a saying often attributed to John Stuart Mill, Lincoln and others) A fundamental principle of liberty and libertarianism is that people should be given as few limits as possible. John Stuart Mill argued for absolute freedom…

Watch the meeting

It’s easy to get totally absorbed in a meeting,* but it really helps if you can reserve a piece of your attention for watching what’s going on as well as participating: What’s the temperature of the team as a whole? Who’s engaged? Who isn’t? Why? Who might have something to say that they’re holding back? How does each person feel?…

Do what I say

With alacrity. Unless… … you’re not confident that you understand what I’m asking. … you think you understand but it still doesn’t make sense. … you think I’m missing something important. … what I say is a clearly a bad idea. … you have a better idea for how to do this. … you can suggest something different altogether that’s…

Leaning in and leaning out

Your posture matters: in conversation at the table or fireside; on a video call (especially on a video call!); with your kids; while you work alone. It’s a signal of intent to yourself as much as to others, and so often our minds follow our bodies. Leaning in usually helps, especially when you don’t feel like it. Leaning out comes…