Who wins

… depends on what we say the game is and when (or whether) we say it ends.* *Who said that the difference between a comedy and a tragedy is whether it ends with a wedding or a funeral? See also: Champion, or Ways to Win (1)World without ends

First to the top (more wrapper than race)

Is the first kid to the top of the climbing frame the fastest climber, or just the kid who’s… Come to the park Involved in the conversation The first one to realise there’s a game on Interested in playing Standing a bit closer to the climbing frame Prepared to run and climb with the wood-chip in their shoe or down…

Seth Godin on books, culture and influence

For five-hundred years, books have mattered. Books have never reached the preponderance of people because there are just so many different titles. It’s possible for a movie to be seen by twenty or thirty million people. It’s likely that a national TV show could be seen by almost as many on a regular basis. But a book? If a book…

In search of nuance

In an age of polarisation, we need nuanced understanding of people and issues more than ever. What does nuance mean to you? To me it means things like: Knowing some of the shortcomings of your side of the debate; Seeing – and not excusing – the failings (and worse) of people on your side of the debate; Looking for reasons…

10k

… views of DriverlessCroc, as of 23rd September 2020, not including email subscribers. At 9k I suggested that 250 views per week would be a good target weekly average. The last three weeks have seen an average of 309 views per week, so things are going well. I’m hoping that the acceleration will continue, so from now on I’ll share…

Amy Orben on tech panics of the past

In 1941 Mary Preston published “Children’s Reactions to Movie Horrors and Radio Crime” in The Journal of Pediatrics … The American paediatrician had studied hundreds of six to sixteen-year-old children and concluded that over half were severely addicted to radio and movie crime dramas, having given themselves “over to a habit-forming practice very difficult to overcome, no matter how the aftereffects are…

Grace and mistakes

I’m a big believer in grace and second (and third) chances; I wouldn’t, couldn’t live without them. In the absence of enough information to make an unambiguously correct decision (for example, in a disciplinary matter) I think it’s better to make a mistake on the side of generosity, kindness and benefit of the doubt rather than than to make the…

Nameless dread (2): calling HALT

My occasional feeling of nameless dread goes something like this: I’ve forgotten to do something something; I’ve let someone down; I’ve neglected something important; There isn’t enough time; I’ve been wronged; I’m a terrible person; I’m going to be found out; I’ve squandered something good; Everything’s going to go wrong; Everyone’s going to die (eventually); It’s possible, eventually, that I…

Responsibility: who pays?

Taking responsibility means that you commit to doing what’s necessary to make something happen – and that you pay for your mistakes. We are often reluctant about the second part – I think with good intentions. But if people keep making the same mistakes at someone else’s expense, there’s a good chance that they don’t really understand the cost. Having…